Failing to Make The Connection

I’m not sure there is one but Valerie Strauss at the Washington Post’s Answer Sheet blog, is seeking a connection between mobile technology and school reform.

It’s a tenuous link at best but no more far fetched than one at the foundation of national education policy connecting college attendance for the vast majority of students and the country’s economic health.

William J. Mathis, managing director of the nonprofit National Eduction Policy Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder’s School of Education, wrote recently on this blog that 70 percent of U.S. jobs require only on-the-job training, 10 percent require technical training, and 20 percent require a college education.

He wrote further that while the Obama administration insists that future jobs will require much higher and universal skills, the Washington-based Brookings Institution says that the country’s job structure profile is likely not to change much in the near future, and the proportion of middle skill jobs (plumbers, electricians, health care, police officers, etc.) will remain robust.

Then there’s the larger misconception that education quality (in the form of international standardized test scores) is directly connected to America’s economic success.

America’s reclaimed dominance in mobile technology — and its ability to economically compete — don’t have much to do with international tests, or, for that matter, school reform that is obsessed with measuring schools, students and teachers on standardized tests that weren’t designed for such assessment.

It’s time that our leaders stop saying otherwise.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem as if that’s going to happen any time soon.

 

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