wasting bandwidth since 1999

Just Taking Up Space

The cover story in the current issue of Time magazine promises to tell us all How to Make Great Teachers.

But I haven’t read the main article yet since I got diverted to a sidebar that looks at the education policies of the four people still running for president.

I guess to keep the whole thing simple for their short attention span readers, the editors narrowed the education issues down to four hot button issues: No Child Left Behind, vouchers, merit pay and the length of the school day/year.

To avoid doing any real reporting, they also clearly pulled the information from the candidates web sites and then they only presented a yes or no answer followed by a one sentence policy statement.

Anyway, the responses on NCLB and vouchers are pretty much what you’d expect (Democrats no, Republicans yes). For each candidate they also present one “bright idea” to improve education.

So, which of Huckabee’s advisors do you suppose came up with this one? “Supports “personalized learning” that would, for example, allow students to get gym credit for karate class.” (Nice job, Chuck!)

In the end, however, this is nothing but filler to avoid empty space in the magazine.

It’s certainly not the kind of in depth reporting a major news organization should be doing on what should be an important campaign issue.

education, president, campaign, issue

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2 Comments

  1. What could a president do on the federal level? When hasn’t comprehensive national education reform failed or, at best, succeeded within the margin of error?

    Education reform is the reason I vote in the state elections, not the presidential ones.

    http://awaitingtenure.wordpress.com/

  2. Tim

    Whether we like it or not, education has become a federal issue, just one consequence of No Child Left Behind.

    Because of NCLB we are fast approaching a national curriculum focused almost exclusively on reading and math. And that curriculum is aimed solely at the “average” child rather than being differentiated to meet the needs of all kids.

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