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Tag: iste (Page 1 of 5)

Does This Union Make Sense?

ISTE Expo

At the end of September, members of ISTE received an email from the president of their Board of Directors, announcing that the board had voted to merge with another educational organization, ASCD.1 I assume the ASCD mail list received a similar message.

It seems like a rather odd combination, for reasons I still can’t quite pin down.

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Is This Meeting Necessary?

What did we learn?

At the end of next month, ISTE will hold its first live conference in three years.

In late June of normal times, the organization could expect to pack at least 15,000 people into a big-city convention center for the largest edtech conference and expo (with more and more emphasis on “expo”) in the US.1

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Testing Live Conferences

Jumping for Joy

Last summer I posted some rambling thoughts in this space on the future of in-person edtech conferences.

Asking questions like: after nearly two years of remote professional development activities, will educators want to return to face-to-face meetings involving hundreds of participants in a confined space? Will they and their schools want to spend the money to make it happen?

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The Future of EdTech Conferences

ISTE Expo

Back when I was still working for the overly-large school district, I routinely attended several edtech conferences every year. That included the one produced by our state organization VSTE1, usually the huge ISTE event, and always EduCon.

But those three were the very small tip of a very large iceberg. If I had an unlimited budget, and didn’t have to do an actual job, I could have traveled to a couple hundred conferences. And far more if you included every K12 education-related meeting held in just the US.

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I Think I’m Done With ISTE

ISTE Expo

I first joined ISTE1 in 1995 when the organization’s journal was called The Computing Teacher.

It was 1999 when I attended my first conference, then called the National Educational Computing Conference, in Atlantic City of all places. I’ve been back 15 times since.

Which means I’ve been watching ISTE grow and change for a long time. But now I’ve reached a point where I may not continue as a member.2

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