Picture Post #17

A random assortment of my photographs from the past couple of weeks. More, of course, in Flickr.

Umbrellas

Umbrellas used to decorate the ceiling of the walkway to a parking garage in downtown Silver Spring, Maryland. Nice idea.

 

Dots

I don’t do still life work very often, but I should since it helps me to better learn my camera. I like this particular shot from a session with Kathy in her studio.

 

Chris

From EduCon last January, Chris Lehmann, founder of both the conference and Science Leadership Academy and all-round nice person, in one of his more relaxed moments that weekend.

 

Nap

Some birds taking a rest on Roosevelt Island in the Potomac River between DC and Virginia. Considering how long we’ve live here, I can’t believe it was my first time visiting the island.

 

Eat!

Just a random shot from a local crafts store. My wife is into this little corner of maker so I find myself in these places a lot.

Picture Post #2

Last weekend I visited Roanoke for a couple of days on VSTE (Virginia Society for Technology in Education) business. And it rained almost the whole time. But I still got a few nice shots.

Hotel Roanoke

This view of the Hotel Roanoke reminds me of some of the half timbered buildings we saw in Chester, England. Inside and out it’s very much a throwback building.

Barber Shop

The kind of window sign you might have seen on the streets of Mayberry.

Face

A wooden statue standing in front of a restaurant.

Rain Drops

As I said, it rained a lot.

Hotel Partitions

Glass barriers that used to form booths for pay phones. As I said, it’s a very traditional hotel.

Winning The Race

During my travels around our overly-large school district, I came across a large banner hanging in the front hall of an elementary school declaring “The Race for Excellence Has No Finish Line”.

That sign has stuck with – and bothered – me for several reasons, but mostly because of the suggestion that excellence is a race. And in our competative culture, that implies a contest with someone (or something), resulting in one winner, and probably multiple losers.

Ok, I’m pretty sure that was not the intention of whoever created the message. They wanted a short, understandable concept to inspire the kids. The interpretation above could only be the product of my warped little head.

Certainly no 10-year-old would read it the same way, right?