wasting bandwidth since 1999

The Grammar of Hyperlinks

During his session at EduCon, Bud Hunt tried to make the case that hyperlinks might be adjectives.

At the time I wasn’t convinced (more likely I didn’t understand :-), but in this post he offers some good examples of the concept.

Aside from that, the discussion about writing for the web that Bud lead was a highlight of last weekend.

[Hopefully videos from this and other EduCon sessions will be posted soon]

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3 Comments

  1. Tim,

    I’m not convinced, either. But I’m tired of not knowing, so I’m writing my way through it.

    I’m so pleased to have met you and to discover that you found the session useful!

  2. I was at Bud’s session and was also confused by his statement that “hyperlinks are adjectives.” Maybe they are not technically adjectives, but they certainly define the context of the word that is linked. Links defiantly add more meaning. Very interesting thought though, I never really considered how the meaning of words can change by simply linking them.

    I really enjoyed the discussion that ensued about audience. I have struggled with this for some time (and it sounds like others are too). In fact, so much that I have stopped writing for a time. What was/is your take on that part of the conversation?

  3. Tim

    Maybe we could settle on the fact that hyperlinks are modifiers. Certainly, the process of choosing links that enhance your writing is a skill to be learned.

    Travis: I was the voice on the side of the room that kicked off the discussion about audience. I always remember my English teachers talking about the importance of that aspect of writing. However, the more I write for the web the more I’ve come to embrace the concept of the “unknown audience”.

    I think all of us write for the people we think will be interested in what we’re saying. But we also need to consider that any post could be sucked up into a Google search we never anticipated and read by someone we never expected. That’s especially a concept we need to relate to our students.

    So, can you ever plan for the unknown reader? I don’t know but it’s one more idea that keeps running around my head. :-)

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