Clark County, Nevada is a huge school system. The district, which includes the city of Las Vegas, has over 200,000 students and expects to add over 40,000 in the next decade. As a result they are constantly scrambling to find new teachers. One of their tools is a piece of software they developed to pinpoint where people are the most miserable (weather, economy, etc.) and targeting their marketing efforts at teachers or potential teachers in that area.

"We can check for applicants in areas where there’s bad weather, economic downturns, a whole variety of quality-of-life elements," said Greg Halloposs, the district’s director of e-recruiting and technology, who wrote the software for the human resources department. "When teachers are sick of shoveling snow, we send them an e-mail reminding them that it’s warm and sunny here 300 days of the year. It sounds cruel that we call it the misery index, but in reality it’s been a very effective tool for recruitment."

The only reason this article caught my eye is that I started my teaching career in Clark County (Dan Tanna and Binzer were running around town at the time :-) and the place is not exactly paradise, notwithstanding the street by that name. I wonder if they’ve computed a misery index for Las Vegas when it hits 110° for the fifteenth day in a row. Well, at least they don’t have hurricanes.