wasting bandwidth since 1999

Playing Calendar Games

Offered without comment:

Several prominent Virginia superintendents [including ours] are pushing the state to give standardized tests months earlier in the school year, a shift they say would reduce the impact of testing on classes and free teachers to offer more meaningful lessons. [emphasis mine]

Ok, maybe just one.

Why not just go straight to those “meaningful lessons”, the “key 21st century skills that are linked to college and career readiness”, and the “hands-on kind of learning they’re great at”, and cut way back on excessive and incredibly wasteful, one-size-fits-all testing programs? Do that instead of playing games with the damn calendar.

Incidentally, that last paragraph should be screamed, not read.

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2 Comments

  1. anonymous

    Where agree that moving the calendar is completely and utterly asinine, it is for a much different reason. As a Civics teacher, I remember the days when the 7th grade teachers would come to me and tell me they did not make it past Vietnam and I would need to make sure I covered that information before the SOL’s.

    I know of very few jobs where there is no accountability for your actions. The people that want to get rid of the SOL’s need to propose some other sort of accountability program. I am NOT a fan of multiple choice standardized questioning; however, I am a fan of accountability. If there is a “better” way to keep all the students and teachers accountable then let’s do it.

    • Tim

      I certainly don’t believe there should be NO assessment of student progress. However, the system we have now evaluates only the most rudimentary retention of facts and basic skills. Which is fine since the curriculum has been dumbed down to match the tests, with scripts (aka “pacing guides”) to make sure every kid gets drilled the exact same way.

      As to not getting past Vietnam in 7th grade, I wonder if maybe those teachers found something more interesting that happened prior to the 60’s. Or if maybe the students found the 50’s irrelevant and boring. There are large chunks of our traditional curriculum, in all areas not just social studies, that fit that description and which should be rethought, revised, and/or replaced.

      BTW, please do not post here anonymously again. I have no problem with people challenging what I write but own your opinion.

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