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Tag: guangzhou

The Traditional and The Modern

Today was another where we got to see multiple sides of China and I’ve had a hard time picking two shots to represent the day. I’m on my third 64gb memory card so it will take a while after we get back to sort through all the images and post some sets.

Anyway, during one of our walks this morning we passed through a market with stalls offering the raw ingredients for traditional medical treatments, like these dried sea horses. Probably no coincidence the market was right next to a hospital. Our guide said that most people in the country still depend on home brew remedies since the health system cannot handle the demand.

Then here’s another side of Guangzhou, the opera house in which the choir I’m traveling with performed last night. Looks a little like a space craft out of any number of scifi movies or TV shows. And it’s very low profile compared to the surrounding buildings which, as in all the cities we’ve visited, are massive and don’t skimp on the LED lights. BTW, you can catch Riverdance here in July.

Next we head to Hong Kong, our final stop on this tour.

Travel Day

Not much interesting today. We flew from Shanghai to Guangzhou, the third largest city in China (4th largest in the world with about 24 million people), a major trading center, and a place I knew almost nothing about before doing research for this trip. But the flight was delayed three hours for weather so instead of Guangzhou we got to experience a waiting room in the Shanghai airport for a while. Not much different from many U.S. terminals.

After finally arriving we did have a little time to walk through the area around our hotel and came across this dance exercise group in a large downtown park. Lots of other people were out for an evening walk in the high heat and humidity, a big change from Shanghai which was pleasantly mild during our stay. This part of China is in a tropical region, at about the same latitude as Havana, Cuba.

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