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The Supremes Say No To Vouchers

Or at least the high court declined to hear a case dealing with school vouchers, and in the process knocked the supporters of the concept down a few pegs.

They let stand a ruling from a lower court which said that a Maine law forbidding the use of state funds to send students to religious schools is constitutional.

In Maine, school districts in 145 small towns with no high schools offer tuition for 17,000 students to attend high schools of their choice, public or private, in-state or out-of-state. But religious schools are no longer on the list.

Asking the court to take the case, a conservative group, the Institute for Justice, is representing eight Maine families who would receive public tuition funds but for the fact that their children attend religious schools.

I wonder what part of the concept of separation of church and state these people don’t understand.

supreme court, vouchers, maine

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3 Comments

  1. superdestroyer

    You argument would make more sense if the government did not provide financial aid to students at universities like Notre Dame, Baylor, Trinity University, Georgetown, Augustana College, SMU, etc.

    Why is government support of tuition for a religous school wrong if the student is 16 but OK is the student is 18?

  2. tim

    Actually, government funding of colleges is just as wrong as using tax dollars for private K12 schools. And you’ll find nothing in my rantings that argues otherwise.

    If we’re going to accept the concept of separation of church and state (an arrangement which benefits both sides), then it must be absolute.

    Still waiting to read your blog, superdestroyer. :-)

  3. superdestroyer

    Since the concept of separation of church and state is not in the constitution it is not absolute. However, the anit-establishment clause is.

    The question would be how offering either college scholarships or K-12 vouchers that can be used all all religious schools equally violates the anti-establishment clause?

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