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Category: science and technology Page 1 of 35

Talking to Alexa: Skill of the Future?

When some shiny new technology starts getting lots of hype, you can bet that articles on using it in school will quickly follow. That’s certainly true of those rapidly multiplying voice-activated artificially-intelligent devices.

The title of a recent article in Education Week asks if interacting with these devices is a “skill of the future”, or just a bad idea.

Photo Post – Maker Faire NoVA

At the start of the month I was privileged to be one of the photographers for the 6th annual Maker Faire here in Northern Virginia. Below are a few of the images I made and more are in this Flickr album.

Dissecting Dyson

The area of the Faire where anyone can tear apart computers, printers, and other electronic devices is very popular. I’ve always wanted to see what’s inside my Dyson vacuum but my wife would probably object.

 Drone Pilot

In the drones and robot section, this young lady showed some real skills as a pilot. Look at that concentration.

Antenna

You never know who or what you’ll run into at the Faire. This gentleman is an amateur radio enthusiast (I guess it’s still called ham radio) headed to his group’s booth.

Maker Faire NoVA - Johnson Center

I also made a few 360° images at the Faire. This is in one of the larger halls at the Johnson Center. More 360° are in the Flickr album.

Building a New Math Curriculum

Chalkboard with math symbols

Conrad Wolfram, probably the only modern mathematician that anyone outside the field might have heard of, wants to build a new math curriculum. One that actually assumes computational devices exist.

Today, computation now gets done fantastically well by computers—better than anyone could ever have imagined 1,500 years ago. But what we’re doing in education right now is making people learn how to calculate by hand, but not learn how to do problem solving at a high level. They’re learning how to do computation, and not leaving that to the machines. Until we fix that fundamental issue, we’re not going to have the subject of math converging with what we need in the real world.

Think about how most of the math problems presented to students are structured. They are required to remember the right algorithmic process, stick in the numbers, and grind the wheels until the “right” answer pops out. And repeat with the next one in the set. That has changed very little since I was in high school and I have the textbook on my shelf to prove it.

The way mathematics is actually used, is very different. In reality, math is a tool used to help solve problems in a variety of fields from business to social science, science to the arts, engineering to even linguistics. About the only place math is studied independently is in pure research. And K12 schools.

So, what about the hot new topic of coding? Everybody needs to learn that, right?

Today we need people to learn how to code. It’s what I call step two of the problem-solving process. The first is trying to define the problem. Step two is extract to the language of math, which today is usually code. You want to write it so the computer can understand it, but so you can also communicate it. Step three is calculating, what we’ve been discussing, and hopefully you get a computer to do that.

Coding is crucial. If you think about coding as learning how to abstract a problem, which I think is really hard especially the fuzzier and more complex the problem gets, then I think it’s good we’re seeing this being encouraged.

I think that tying math together with computational thinking and other subjects, and combining it with code, would be the absolutely ideal direction for the future.

Learning to code, like math, is not an independent course of study. It is also a tool that must be learned in context.

There’s more to this interview and it’s worth a read.

Wolfram is right that we need to completely revise the K12 math curriculum to focus on “computational thinking” instead of having students crank through processes better done by machine. I’m just not as confident that the change will happen as quickly as he seems to believe.


Image of a chalkboard with math symbols I might have written when I was teaching the subject is a free download from Pixabay and is used under a Creative Commons license.

The Real Meaning of Pi

Chalkboard with Pi

Today is Pi Day. Because the 14th of March could be written as 3.14, the first three digits for the irrational number we all learned something about in elementary mathematics.

Of course, this little bit of trivia only works if you’re writing the date as we do in the US. The whole exercise falls apart in most of the rest of the world where they traditionally write the day before the month. 14.3 makes no sense.

Anyway, beyond the fluff of memorizing lots of the digits and serving actual pies to math teachers (which we do appreciate), pi is a core mathematical concept with a long history and many important applications.

In this New Yorker article from three years ago, a math professor at Cornell University briefly offers a few reasons Why Pi Matters.

So it’s fair to ask: Why do mathematicians care so much about pi? Is it some kind of weird circle fixation? Hardly. The beauty of pi, in part, is that it puts infinity within reach. Even young children get this. The digits of pi never end and never show a pattern. They go on forever, seemingly at random—except that they can’t possibly be random, because they embody the order inherent in a perfect circle. This tension between order and randomness is one of the most tantalizing aspects of pi.

A little knowledge makes for a better Pi Day.


The image is from the header of the New Yorker article.

What’s Your Attitude Towards Science?

Word cloud based on question

3M, the US-based conglomerate probably best known for their Post-It notes, recently released a report called the State of Science Index. They call it “one of the largest, most global studies” done in recent years to gain some understanding of the public attitude towards scientists and their work, surveying more than 14,000 people in 14 countries.

Overall, the general attitudes expressed were positive:

  • 87% said that their general attitude towards science was one of fascination, rather than boring.
  • The same percentage thought “the world is a better place today because of science” and were “hopeful” when they heard the word mentioned.
  • Two-thirds said they were “excited when thinking about the future impact of science on society” and that “science is very important to society in general”.

However, when you dig down into the responses, there is much to be worried about.

I don’t mind the 32% who said they were “skeptical” of science. Questioning claims made in scientific reports is a healthy approach to understanding complex ideas. Especially since most people get their science news from a TV news reader who likely doesn’t understand beyond the summary statement in their script.

Far more troubling than skeptics is the 27% of respondents who “do not see the point of needing to understand science as adults”. Plus the relatively large percentage of people who agree with statements like “If science didn’t exist, my everyday life would not be all that different.” and who fail to see a link between scientific research and “technology”.

In the US, these numbers parallel the around-30% in political poll after poll who refuse to accept basic scientific findings like the existence of climate change as major problem facing society. Or who believe that childhood vaccinations are some kind of conspiracy between doctors and drug companies.

These kinds of attitude surveys can be interesting, although they should also be read with some skepticism. But if you teach middle or high school students, you may want to give them the executive summary and ask them to reflect on the findings. How do their attitudes compare to those of the adults in this survey?

Of course, the 3M Index is looking at current opinions and only tangentially addresses the state of science education. However, how children are taught science during their years in K12 directly affects their understanding of science as adults.

There is a direct link between classroom science instruction that involves memorizing lots of facts and little direct interaction with scientific concepts and the 86% of respondents who say they know “little or nothing” about science. And the large percentage of those people who have no interest in learning more as adults.

Unfortunately, we tend to elect far too many of those people to leadership positions.


I learned of this survey through a discussion with former astronaut Scott Kelly on Marketplace Tech, a daily podcast about how technology affects our lives.

The image is from the executive summary of this report and shows the word cloud created when people were asked to complete this task: “Please fill in what you think science is in no more than two to three sentences. Science is…”.

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